thai desserts

15 Thai Desserts Every Sweet Tooth Should Try At Least Once

15 Thai Desserts Every Sweet Tooth Should Try At Least Once

Exploring Thai Desserts

Whether you’re in Bangkok or Nanaimo, there’s a Thai dessert waiting for you that will make your taste buds sing. From the sweet mango sticky rice to coconut-based treats, these desserts are sure to hit the spot. If you’re looking for a new culinary adventure, be sure to add some Thai desserts to your list! Thai dishes are globally known to be delicious and their desserts are no exception.

  • Khao Niao Mamuang (Mango Sticky Rice)
  • Khao Niao Toorien (Durian Sticky Rice)
  • Itim Kati (Coconut Ice Cream)
  • Khanom Buang (Thai Crispy Pancakes)
  • Khanom Krok (Coconut Pancakes)
  • Mamuang Nam Pla Wan (Green Mango With Sweet Chili Spices)
  • Khanom Ba Bin (Grilled Coconut Cakes)
  • Thong Yip (Sweet Egg Yolk Cups)
  • Khanom Tom (Shredded Coconut Balls)
  • Kluai Thot (Deep-Fried Bananas)
  • Foi Thong (Golden Threads)
  • Khanom Chan (Steamed Coconut-Pandan Cake)
  • Chao Kuai (Grass Jelly)
  • Khao Lam (Sticky Rice in Bamboo)
  • Ruam Mit (Thai Mixed Dessert)

mango sticky rice

Khao Niao Mamuang (Mango Sticky Rice)

Oh man, Thai mango sticky rice is one of the most delicious things on the planet. It’s sweet and sticky and just perfect. I could eat it every day.

 

Mango Sticky Rice is one of my favorite desserts and likely the favourite of many people reading this. It’s made with glutinous rice, coconut milk, sugar, and of course, fresh mangoes. The rice is usually steamed in a bamboo basket and then coconut milk and sugar are added before serving. The flavors all meld together perfectly and the sticky rice pairs perfectly with the sweet Mangoes. I’m drooling just thinking about it!

fresh durian

Khao Niao Toorien (Durian Sticky Rice)

If you’re a fan of durian, then you’ll love this sticky rice dessert. It’s made in the same manner as mango sticky rice, but instead of using mangoes, slices of durian are used as the topping. Durian is a divisive fruit, but if you’re one of the people who enjoy its unique flavour, then you’ll want to try this dish.

Thai coconut ice cream

Itim Kati (Coconut Ice Cream)

This coconut-based dessert is the perfect way to cool down on a hot day. It’s made with coconut milk, sugar, and salt, then frozen until it’s solid. Once it’s frozen, it’s shaved into thin strips and served in a bowl. The ice cream is refreshing and has a strong coconut flavour that will leave you wanting more.

 

📷 Photo Credit: You Know You’ve Lived In Thailand when…..

crispy Thai pancakes

Khanom Buang (Thai crispy pancakes)

Khanon buang is a traditional Thai dessert passed down generation to generation. Dating back roughly 600 years ago, the Thai crispy pancake is a street food that requires precise preparation. It consists of a thin, crispy crepe made from rice flour and is topped with candied duck egg yolk.

 

These thin, crispy pancakes are popular street food in Thailand. They’re made with rice flour, coconut milk, sugar, and salt, and are usually filled with shredded coconut or ground peanuts. The pancakes are fried until they’re golden brown and crispy, then served with a sweet dipping sauce.

 

📷 Photo Credit: Trương Thị Nhớ

khanom krok coconut pancakes

Khanom Buang (Thai Crispy Pancakes)

These thin, crispy pancakes are popular street food in Thailand. They’re made with rice flour, coconut milk, sugar, and salt, and are usually filled with shredded coconut or ground peanuts. The pancakes are fried until they’re golden brown and crispy, then served with a sweet dipping sauce.

 

📷 Photo Credit: Culynyl

green mango with chilies dip

Mamuang Nam Pla Wan (Green Mango With Sweet Chili Spices)

This is a simple but delicious dessert that’s made with unripe green mangoes, sugar, and salt. The mangoes are sliced thin and served with a sweet chili dipping sauce. The combination of sweet, sour, and spicy flavours is incredibly addicting.

 

📷 Photo Credit: We ❤ Non Veg Recipes Facebook Group

grilled coconut cakes

Khanom Ba Bin (Grilled coconut cakes)

Khanom Ba Bin is a Thai dessert that combines sweet, salty, and sour flavors in a way that’s uniquely addictive. The reason it tastes so good is because it exploits the human palate’s natural preference for sweet, salty, and sour flavors.

 

📷 Photo Credit: dmAsia

thong yip sweet egg yolk cup

Thong Yip (Sweet Egg Yolk Cups)

Thong yip is a gold-colored Thai dessert with the word thong in its name, which means gold, representing prosperity, more money, and success. This golden-hued dessert is generally composed of duck and chicken egg yolks, sugar, and jasmine-flavored water and is usually molded into a flower or a five-point star shape.

 

Thong Yip, also known as sweet egg yolk cups, are often made for weddings and other luck-bringing celebrations like New Year’s Eve. It is said that they bring good fortune, abundance, and wealth. Keep an eye out for them during Thailand’s many national holidays as well!

 

📷 Photo Credit: nokjaa

thai coconut balls

Khanom Tom (Shredded Coconut Balls)

Khanom Tom is a traditional Thai dessert that’s made with shredded coconut, tapioca starch, and palm sugar. The mixture is formed into small balls and boiled until they float to the surface. Once they’re cooked, they’re rolled in more shredded coconut and served.

 

These little balls have a chewy texture and a sweet, coconutty flavour that’s hard to resist. They’re a popular dessert at Thai restaurants, but they’re also easy to make at home.

 

📷 Photo Credit: Eating Well

kluai thot deep fried bananas

Kluai Thot (Deep-Fried Bananas)

Kluai thot is a popular Thai dessert that’s made with bananas, tapioca flour, and coconut milk. The bananas are coated in the flour mixture, then deep-fried until they’re golden brown. They’re usually served with a sweet dipping sauce or honey.

 

The fried bananas have a crispy exterior and a soft, fluffy interior. The combination of sweet and savory flavors is simply irresistible.

 

📷 Photo Credit: Thai Food Online

foi thong golden threads

Foi Thong (Golden Threads)

Foi thong is a Thai dessert that’s made with egg yolks, sugar, and flour. The mixture is piped into hot oil to create long, thin threads of dough that are fried until they’re golden brown. Once they’re cooked, they’re rolled in sugar and served.

 

These delicate threads have a crispy texture and a sweet flavor. They’re often served as part of a larger dessert, but they’re also delicious on their own.

 

📷 Photo Credit: unyamaneeaom

khanom chan coconut-pandan cake

Khanom Chan (Steamed Coconut-Pandan Cake)

Khanom chan is a Thai dessert that’s made with coconut milk, pandan extract, and tapioca flour. The ingredients are combined and steamed until they form a thick, sticky cake. Once it’s cooked, it’s cut into small squares and served.

 

This cake has a soft, fluffy texture and a sweet, coconutty flavor. It’s often served with a scoop of ice cream or a drizzle of condensed milk.

 

📷 Photo Credit: Cindy Her Creations

chao kuai grass jelly

Chao Kuai (Grass Jelly)

Chao kuai is a Thai dessert that’s made with black grass jelly, tapioca pearls, and palm sugar syrup. It’s a popular street food, and it’s often served with shaved ice and condensed milk.

 

The grass jelly has a chewy texture and a mildly sweet flavor. The tapioca pearls add a bit of sweetness and texture, while the shaved ice and condensed milk help to balance out the flavors.

 

📷 Photo Credit: Wikimedia

khao lam bamboo sticky rice

Khao Lam (Sticky Rice in Bamboo)

Khao lam is a Thai dessert that’s made with sticky rice, coconut milk, and sugar. The ingredients are steamed inside a hollowed-out bamboo stalk until they’re tender and gooey. Once it’s cooked, the khao lam is cut into slices and served.

 

📷 Photo Credit: mica tuca

ruam mit thai mxied dessert

Ruam Mit (Thai Mixed Dessert)

Ruam mit is a popular Thai dessert that’s made with a variety of fruits and sweets. It generally includes mango, jackfruit, watermelon, cantaloupe, coconut strips, tapioca pearls, jelly cubes, and sticky rice.

 

This sweet and refreshing dessert is perfect for a hot day. The fruit provides a refreshing and juicy contrast to the sticky rice, while the tapioca pearls add a bit of chewiness.

 

If you’ve ever experienced Filipino street food, you might be familiar with a similarly constructed dish called halo-halo!

 

📷 Photo Credit: thai_shock

Ready to try authentic Thai desserts?

If you’re ever in Thailand, be sure to try some of the delicious desserts. They may look strange, but they’re all worth trying. Don’t judge a book by its cover!

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